Clean Boating Foundation is hiring!

Clean Boating Foundation is seeking a dynamic program manager to manage the existing programs within CBF and look for new ways to grow the organization. The Program Manager is a key member of the CBF team and is expected to execute the organization’s goals, especially as it relates to certifying boatyards as clean.

Clean Boating Foundation began in May 2011 and is a growing organization that provides a real niche in Puget Sound’s recovery. We engage boating businesses and boaters with voluntary outreach efforts that showcase practices that will improve water quality. Working with boatyards in particular, this role works on the program that assists boatyards in using voluntary, market-based solutions to help them meet the benchmarks within the Boatyard Permit. We award our seal to those boatyards that are taking the extra-steps to protect Puget Sound.

This position reports to the Executive Director.
Specific Responsibilities:
Oversee the implementation of Clean Boating Foundation’s Certified Clean Boatyard Program.
Collaborate with Executive Director and board
Collaborate on communications, messaging and media.
Build relationships with stakeholders, including environmental groups, businesses, Department of Ecology, funders and community groups.
Ensure the success of the Certified Clean Boatyard Program.
Assist with the Northwest Boatyard and Marina Conference
Serve as a sounding board for various ideas and concepts
Prepare blog posts and use social media in a continual basis and as part of an overall media plan.
Ensure that Boatyards have partner as they navigate a complex regulatory framework.

Skills and Experience:

Required
Experience and leadership developing and implementing successful programs and/or campaigns
Successful sales approach to work-style
Familiarity with key groups and businesses in the area.
In-depth knowledge and insights regarding Washington state’s lay of the land from a political and business perspective.
Demonstrate ability for strategic planning, communications and the ability to dive right into projects.
Ability to maintain a flexible schedule that may include evenings and weekend work and travel throughout Puget Sound.
Strong writing skills

Desirable

Experience working with an environmental organization within Washington state.
Understanding of recreational boating, esp within Washington state.
Success in fundraising and securing grants

Salary and Benefits:

Clean Boating Foundation provides competitive hourly-rate compensation. This would be a part-time position. 7 hours per week (on average) and pay would be $20/hour.
Application Instructions:
Please send a cover letter, resume and three writing samples to peter@nullcleanboatingfoundation.org until position is filled. Indicate “Program Manager” in the subject line.
No phone calls.
This job description generally describes the principal functions and job requirements of the position, as well as the general level of knowledge and skills typically required. This Job Description does not constitute an employment agreement between the employer and employee, and it is subject to change as the needs of the employer and the requirements of the job change.

Come find the Clean Boating Foundation booth at the Seattle Boat Show

You love that jingle or you love to hate that jingle. Regardless, it’s “the Boat Show, the Boat Show, the big Seattle Boat Show” time. The Seattle Boat Show starts on January 27 and runs through Saturday, February 4. Stop by our booth (307 in the East Hall) and say hi to your trusty olde staff and volunteers. Not only will you find the latest info on non-copper paint, but also we want to make sure you know about the harmful critters out there called zebra and quagga mussels.

Speaking of non-copper paint, the first date* will be here before we know it so why not make the change to non-copper paint now? Many of the alternatives will be at the show (like Sea Hawk (East Hall 607), Pettit (Concourse 2200) and Interlux/Awlgrip (East Hall 717), but stop by our booth first and we can point you in the right direction. Hope to see you there! 

*What are those dates for the non-copper paint law in Washington state? If you purchase a new recreational boat up to 65-feet, that boat cannot have paint on it’s hull when it arrives in our state after January 1, 2018. The second key date is January 1, 2020. That’s the date when you cannot buy or apply copper bottom paint onto your recreational boat up to 65-feet. These are Washington state laws.

Great news coming out of California

If you are looking for some upbeat, positive developments on the non-copper-paint front, you don’t have to look any further. The Institute for Research and Technical Assistance has some new fact sheets with some very complementary and complimentary work to what we are doing in Washington state. For more info, you can find their fact sheets here and a webinar (Webinar: Safer Alternatives to Copper Antifouling Paints: The Shell Game Must Stop!) that is jam-packed with non-copper paint test results and approaches that keep costs down and paint on your boat without harming marine life and boatyard businesses. Nice work, Dr. Wolf, on the findings. Let’s get you to Washington state.

Sea Grant does it again

We are big fans of Washington Sea Grant.  That is because their information is always timely and accurate. A recent example of this claim can be found on their “Pump, Don’t dump” website. It’s part of their ongoing emphasis of working to change boater’s behavior around clean water and doing the right thing. Take a look at their recent video, follow the steps and pump, don’t dump.

Finally, an immigration bill we all can agree on.

If there’s one issue that brings Democrats and Republicans together around sealing the boarders, it’s the issue of nuisance species like zebran and quagga mussels.

And it’s always great to see George Harris, Northwest Marine Trade Association’s President & CEO, use the bully pulpit to educate boating leaders about zebra and quagga mussels. That’s just what he did in a recent newsletter column. Take a look to get his take on this complex issue. Also, stay tuned for more information on a legislative proposal to revamp our state’s invasive species program. Pretty exciting stuff. From George:

NMTA President’s Report – June 2013

All of us as boaters should know what aquatic invasive species are and the threat they pose to our beloved waterways.  Washington state already has its share of aquatic invasive species like milfoil, grass carp, red swamp crayfish , New Zealand mud snails and about 30 others.  Fortunately we are one of a few states that doesn’t have zebra or quagga mussels.  To keep it that way the City of Bellingham last month announced new boat inspections and fees for boaters that use Lake Whatcom that will significantly change how easily boaters can access this popular lake.  The new regulations are intended to prevent the introduction of zebra and quagga mussels.  In April the Bellingham Herald ran a story with details about the new regulations and you can read it by clicking on this LINK.

Last month, Peter Schrappen and I were in Washington D.C. taking part in the American Boating Congress.  A once a year opportunity to meet with recreational boating leaders from all across the country and get up to speed on critical state and federal issues.   I encourage you to read Peter’s recap of ABC in this issue of WaterLife.  While in DC I attended special focus group about boating access hosted by SOBA – States Organization for Boating Access, www.SOBAUS.org  Coincidentally the evening before the boating access meeting I received a string of emails from two member businesses in the Bellingham area that use Lake Whatcom who were very concerned about the new access restrictions to the lake.  The city ordinance requires all boats that use Lake Whatcom to be inspected for zebra and quagga mussels and pay a $50 annual fee or $20 per day fee.  During the SOBA meeting I learned what other western states are doing to protect their lakes from zebra mussels.  I’m sorry to report it’s not a pretty picture.

I’ve got some very firsthand experience with zebra mussels from my days on the water and under the water in Lake Michigan in the late 80’s and early 90’s when they first arrived in the Great Lakes.  Those were my college days and I taught scuba diving and worked on a scuba diving charter boat during the summers.  In the late 80’s it was actually exciting to find a few zebra mussels on a dive with students.  They were new, novel and something to take pictures of and talk about.  Little did we know they would carpet our beloved wrecks in only 10 years. For the most part zebra mussels have been a problem for the eastern half of the country and here in Washington we’ve been fortunate to not see these fast growing and fast spreading mussels in our lakes and rivers yet.

Zebra mussels and the ecologically similar quagga mussel arrived from Europe in ballast water and were first reported in Lake St. Claire of the Great Lakes in 1988.  Fast forward to 2013 and they are pretty much in every major lake and river east of the Mississippi.  In 2007 zebra mussels appeared in the southwest US for the first time, probably crossing the Rocky Mountains on board a boat from the Great Lakes.  Click on this LINK  and you can see a time lapse slide show that illustrates their spread across the U.S.  Zebra Mussels are incredibly “durable” and can live in a moist environment out of the water for up to 30 days, which is plenty of time for a trip from Milwaukee to Bellingham in a boat.

Up until the new regulations on Lake Whatcom were announced last month the regulations on boaters and boat transporters have been only at the state boarders where the Department of Fish & Wildlife has been inspecting, ticketing and in some cases quarantining and cleaning boats that have zebra mussels on board.  Allen Pleus and Sergeant Carl Klein with the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) are leading our state’s effort to keep zebra mussels out of our waters.  WDFW participated with the 100th Meridian Initiative in producing an 18 minute video about how to inspect your boat.  The video is available online and you can see it by clicking on this LINK .

Sergeant Klein spoke at NMTA’s 2011 Marina & Boatyard Conference in LaConner about invasive species and again this past March in Tacoma for an in-depth workshop on invasive species policy in Washington state and how these policies can impact boating businesses.  According to Sergeant Klein trailerable boats are the number one “vector” for transporting zebra mussels.  I asked Sergeant Klein about other vectors for transport like animals and specifically ducks.  Although possible, there is no evidence that ducks and geese have successfully moved the mussels from an infested lake to a non-infested lake.  According to Sergeant Klein animal transport has been studied near Olympia with the invasive New Zealand mud snail on a lake with limited boating access.  So far they have not seen the snails in any lakes within a 5-mile radius; therefore birds are not a significant concern.  This means prevention is important and we can’t simply shrug our shoulders and say there is nothing we can do.

Seeing the Great Lakes first hand in the 80’s when zebra mussels were first introduced and to see them now is nothing short of shocking.  The impacts to communities and business are real.  A single zebra mussel will filter one liter of water per day resulting in much clearer water.  In the short run that seems like a good thing for a lake – everyone likes clear water – unless you’re a juvenile trout or walleye.  It has certainly improved the visibility for Lake Michigan wreck divers – visibility use to be less than one foot at 100 feet and now it can be over 40 feet at that depth.  The downside is that these wrecks that have been preserved for a hundred years or more are now covered with mussels.

Mussels are everywhere – on the beaches, in water intake systems for drinking water, on marina docks and even in engine cooling systems.  The clear water has changed the food chain and habitat for all types of aquatic life.  Clear water means little to no plankton growth that feeds aquatic insects and juvenile salmon. Zebra and quagga mussels also appear to leave toxic algae alone which promotes their growth that can kill water birds or close a lake due to human and pet health hazards. Light penetrates deeper which creates more vegetation, which creates more habitat for perch and smallmouth bass, which increases predation on juvenile sport fish such as walleye, salmon and trout which creates less opportunity for anglers.  All around bad news!  Northwest salmon which are vital to recreational boating and fishing have enough challenges already and certainly don’t need more predators.  Zebra mussels don’t have many natural predators in North America so there is very little to stop there spread. 

 As an NMTA member you expect our staff and volunteers to keep boating regulations as low and/or reasonable as possible.  That said, at the SOBA meeting last month, I learned a lot about zebra mussel regulation around the country and realized this is a serious and emerging issue for boaters that’s not going to go away.

Going forward we can expect more proposed restrictions related to zebra mussels on boating access in our freshwater lakes and rivers.  NMTA will be at the table to make sure any new regulations are reasonable and consistent across the state.  According to both Allen Pleus and Sergeant Klein reasonable, consistent and well communicated restrictions are the goal of WDFW.  What can you do now?  What do boaters need to know?  According to Sergeant Klein just three things: CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY your boat.  That doesn’t sound too onerous and also great advice for maintaining a boat.

If you have questions about zebra and quagga mussels please contact Allen Pleus or Sergeant Klein directly.  Contact information: 

Sincerely,

George Harris, President/CEO of NMTA (www.nmta.net)

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

What’s with these Derelict Vessels?

Maybe you heard about the recent high profile ships sinking in our waters in recent years (here and here) . That’s a big concern to us, and what’s even more problematic is that the owners skipped town. You should know that these infamous vessels are not recreational boats, but rather have ties to previous lives as a military or commercial watercraft.

Editorials have been written and lawmakers have taken action, but all too often all of us boaters are lumped together. Enough of that. To set the record straight, here are some facts (and some opinions) about the state’s Derelict Vessel Program, managed by the very effective Melissa Ferris and the Department of Natural Resources:

  • The recreational boating industry, the Recreational Boating Association of Washington, the Washington Public Ports Association and recreational boaters in general support getting derelict vessels out of the water. These groups have all been longtime supporters of the program, going back to its inception last decade.
  • Recreational boat owners, unlike commercial interests, pay a fee every time they register their vessel. That fee is $4.00 per boat. Again, it’s a great program, great administrator and the state sorely needs this money.
  • A backlog of recreational boats exists. The state believes there are 220 derelict recreational boats in our waters.
  • Captain Obvious here: The costs go up geometrically once a boat sinks. Let’s get the bad boats out of here and make room for real boaters.

Part of the legislation to renew the derelict-vessel-fee bill, which CBF did not  take a position on, was to develop a workgroup to help devise a system that incorporates commercial interests (and their money) to augment what the state already as (simple math: There are about 240,000 recreational boats in Washington state X the $4.00 fee = the amount of money in their annual “derelict” budget). Additionally, the state Legislature found $4.5 million in their recently-passed budget. Now, we’re talking.

Call to action:

The march continues towards ethanol in the marketplace

The Supreme Court refused to hear a challenge brought forward by our friends at the National Marine Manufacturing Association, which moves us closer to allowing an increased blend of ethanol in the marketplace.

Jonathan Sweet from Boating Industry does a nice job summarizing the recent developments here. The bottom line is that logic and rational thought and boating safety are the bigger losers if/when this change occurs. Take a look at a previous blog I wrote on the oddities of ethanol here (“Ethanol in our Fuel: Good idea or bad?”)

From Jonathan’s piece:

The U.S. Supreme Court won’t hear a challenge brought by marine industry groups and others against the Environmental Protection Agency’s waiver allowing E15 in the marketplace.

Along with groups representing industries ranging from farmers to oil companies, the National Marine Manufacturers Association and the Marine Retailers Association of the Americas had asked the court to review an August 2012 decision by the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. In that case, the appeals court ruled that the groups did not have legal standing to challenge the EPA’s waiver allowing the 15 percent ethanol blend to be sold.

In an email to Boating Industry, the NMMA expressed disappointment in the decision.

“While we are disappointed that the US Supreme Court has denied certiorari on the E15 case in which NMMA is involved, we are committed to continuing our work against mid-level ethanol blends on behalf of the recreational boating industry,” said Nicole Vasilaros, director of Regulatory and Legal Affairs. “Through legislative action and research surrounding alternative biofuels, NMMA continues the fight against the harmful effects of E15. NMMA is also currently involved in a misfueling case that was set aside pending this review. We look forward to any next steps the misfueling case may also provide to protect the recreational boating industry and its consumers.”

Several legislative options to address the use of E15 have also been introduced in both the House and Senate.

  • H.R. 875, introduced by Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., blocks the use of any blend of more than 10 percent ethanol until further study can be done on potential damage from the use of E15. That bill was approved out of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology in April but has had no further action.
  • H.R. 1461 & H.R. 1462, were both introduced by Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va. The two bills call for the reforming of the Renewable Fuel Standard and capping ethanol at 10 percent. Both were introduced in April and referred to the House Subcommittee on Energy & Power.
  • S. 344, introduced by Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Sen. David Vitters, R-La., prohibits the Environmental Protection Agency from issuing waivers for any gasoline blend of more than 10 percent ethanol and would repeal the previous waivers that allowed E15 on the market. The bill has been referred to the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

 

The Great Paradox

One of the difficulties with the Puget Sound and its well-documented demise is that it’s not that well documented. That might sound like a self-contradicting paradox, but it’s not just my take. Rather, it’s something that Puget Sound Partnership discovered early on in their research. The public just isn’t there when it comes to the fact that Puget Sound is in deep trouble. Take a look at their public opinion findings. In my opinion, that has created a whole set of problems for the Partnership. Before they can begin to cure Puget Sound by changing the hearts and minds of Joe Public, they must first convince Joe Public that there’s a problem. It can easily be construed as a mixed message, “Yes, Puget Sound is beautiful. Sadly, the closer you look, the sadder the situation becomes. Trust us.”

Maybe that’s because, on the surface, Puget Sound looks so pristine. However, underneath the glisten belies a different reality, one that continues to get increased attention from all sorts of interests.

It’s what first helped us connect with the Russell Family Foundation. It’s what first connected us with People for Puget Sound, and it’s what continues to motivate us to push and pull boaters to transition today to non-toxic paint for their boats’ bottoms.  Boatyards already are there on the fact that copper coming off their yards is bad. Boaters (who love their Boatyards) want to do their part and, truth be told, cleaner products continue to come on-line that exceed expectations.

Less pollution coming from boats means less pollution in Puget Sound. It’s a simple equation. Fortunately for our outreach, we can promote products (like Martyr Anodes, Pacifica Plus, Ultima Eco, Pump Me Out, Electric Paddle, ePaint, Sea Hawk Smart Solution, and West Marine’s  CFA Eco) and Boatyards that meet our standards. 

Now Hiring: Program Manager, Clean Boating Foundation

After 18 months of commendable service as Program Manager for the Clean Boating Foundation, Ben Lee is moving on to a position at Landau Associates. CBF will miss Ben’s expertise and style. While these are big shoes to fill, we are interested in hearing from candidates that meet the profile we’ve framed out:

Job Announcement
Program Manager, Clean Boating Foundation
June 19, 2013

Clean Boating Foundation is seeking a dynamic program manager to help implement the Certified Clean Boatyard Program. The Program Manager is a key member of the CBF team and is expected to execute the organization’s strategic plan, especially as it relates to certifying boatyards as clean.

Clean Boating Foundation began in May 2011 and is a growing organization that provides a real niche in Puget Sound’s recovery. We engage boating businesses and boaters with voluntary outreach efforts that showcase practices that will improve water quality. Working with boatyards in particular, this role works on the program that assists boatyards in using voluntary, market-based solutions to help them meet the benchmarks within the Boatyard Permit. We award our seal to those boatyards that are taking the extra-steps to protect Puget Sound. 

This position reports to the Executive Director.

Specific Responsibilities:

  • Oversee the implementation of Clean Boating Foundation’s Certified Clean Boatyard Program
  • Collaborate with Executive Director and board
  • Collaborate on communications, messaging and media
  • Build relationships with stakeholders, including environmental groups, businesses, Department of Ecology, funders and community groups
  • Ensure the success of the Certified Clean Boatyard Program
  • Assist with the Northwest Boatyard and Marina Conference

Skills and Experience:
Required

  • Experience and leadership developing and implementing successful programs and/or campaigns
  • Successful sales approach to work-style
  • Familiarity with key groups and businesses in the area
  • In-depth knowledge and insights regarding Washington state’s lay of the land from a political and business perspective
  • Demonstrated ability with strategic planning, communications and the ability to dive right into projects
  • Ability to maintain a flexible schedule that may include evenings and weekend work and travel throughout Puget Sound
  • Strong writing skills

Desirable

  • Experience working with an environmental organization within Washington state
  • Understanding of recreational boating, especially within Washington state
  • Success in fundraising and securing grants

Salary and Benefits:

Clean Boating Foundation provides competitive hourly-rate compensation. This would be a part-time position. 7-10 hours per week (on average).

Application Instructions:

Please send a cover letter, resume and three writing samples to peter@nullcleanboatingfoundation.org indicating “Program Manager” in the subject line. This position will remain open until filled.

No phone calls, please.

This job description generally describes the principal functions and job requirements of the position, as well as the general level of knowledge and skills typically required. This Job Description does not constitute an employment agreement between the employer and employee, and it is subject to change as the needs of the employer and the requirements of the job change. 

Cheers to Three Clean Boating All-Stars

CBF just wrapped up some time on the road and, as we like to do, it’s time to give credit to three inspirational, no-nonsense leaders who are not asking for credit or praise about promoting clean boating. This selflessness only drives us more to give them credit and praise. 
 
As Anheuser-Busch liked to say, “Dave Atwater, Lauren Bivens, and Shane McCall, this Bud’s for you.” First, Dave Atwater, the regional manager of West Marine, dreamed up the idea to have a Clean Boating Symposium in Anacortes last Friday. He took it upon himself to find a host site, publicize the event around the community and within his store, prepare schwag-bags for attendees and probably a ton of other stuff that CBF won’t ever know about. We parachuted in, shared the stage with some other all-stars and were able to spread the CBF gospel to some new faces. 
 
Not to be outdone, and totally unrelated to Dave’s event, Lauren Bivens of Harbor Marine hosted us at his site the following day (June 8). Again, we shared the stage with some Clean Boating stalwarts and were able to spread the gospel with boating leaders (in this case marine surveyors). And again, Lauren called in CBF without any cajoling. Heck, we didn’t even have to broach the subject with these guys about having events at their respective sites. 
 
The other person we want to salute remains a fixture in our powerpoint slides (I saw that. Just because I use the word “powerpoint” does not mean that you need to yawn.) and you may have read about him in a previous blog on this site (My favorite quote from Ben’s interview with Shane McCall: “Aluminum anodes work just as good, if not better than traditional zincs.”) Shane’s part of Emerald City Diving and has gone out of his way to go on record about aluminum anodes. “Big deal,” you might be saying. As I like to say, unless your last name is “zinc” or “cadmium”, why would you be using traditional, toxic zinc anodes? The beautiful thing that Shane has done is to provide first-hand evidence that actually probably hurts his business. Think about it: the more boaters switch to aluminum anodes (which last longer), the less business he will have changing them out. 
 
Gentlemen, this Bud’s for you three.